Poetical Works Of James Montgomery

JamesMontgomeryBookOfPoems

James Montgomery (November 4, 1717 – April 30, 1854)

 

 

Alive once more, respired her native air,

But found no freedom for the voice of prayer :

Again the cowl’d oppressor clank’d his chains,

Flourish’d his scourge, and threatened bonds and pains,

(His arm enfeebled could no longer kill,

But in his heart he was a murderer still ūüôā

Then Christian David, strengtheri’d from above,

Wise as the serpent, harmless as the dove ;

Bold as a lion on his Master’s part,

In zeal a seraph, and a child in heart ;

PluckM from the gripe of antiquated laws,

( Even as a mother from the felon-jaws

Of a lean wolf, that bears her babe away,

With courage beyond nature, rends the prey,)

The little remnant of that ancient race :

Far in Lusatian woods they found a place ;

There, where the sparrow builds her busy nest,

And the clime-changing swallow loves to rest,

Thine altar, God of Hosts ! there still appear

The tribes to worship, unassail’d by fear ;

We¬†cannot and absolutely will not¬†apologize for the smiley emoticon at the end of line 6. If we were to remove the parentheses, ” () “we would be left with just¬†the colon ” : ” therefore, we are keeping to its true¬†format in which we found it.

If you are interested in reading the book in its entirety, you can do so by using Google: James Montgomery – Montgomery’s Poetical Works. You will be able to save the book in .PDF for your reading enjoyment.

handwritten letter James Montgomery

Letter from Montgomery to his Solicitor, James Wilson Esq.,  c. 1838

A handwritten letter on notepaper from James Montgomery to his Solicitor James Wilson Esq. of East Parade Sheffield, regarding a payment of £400 in part of a larger sum left to Montgomery by his deceased friend Rowland Hodgeson of Highfield, Sheffield.

The letter’s header reads¬†The Mount (his Sheffield home) July 7, 1838. The reverse side of the paper is the address of the Solicitor and Montgomery’s black, wax seal.

– altered by Hystoria

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